US says will work with UAE, Qatar on Egypt's crisis

The new push will rely on the United Arab Emirates to work with the army-backed interim government and Qatar, which supported the Mursi administration, to liaise with the Brotherhood.

US says will work with UAE, Qatar on Egypt's crisis

World Bulletin/News Desk

The United States said on Friday it would work with other nations to resolve Egypt's crisis peacefully.

"We will work very, very hard together with others, in order to bring parties together to find a peaceful resolution that grows the democracy and respects the rights of everybody," Kerry said before a meeting United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed in London.

The army removed Mursi and his Muslim Brotherhood from power on July 3 in response to mass protests against his rule.

With the European Union already mediating, the new push will rely on the United Arab Emirates to work with the army-backed interim government and Qatar, which supported the Mursi administration, to liaise with the Brotherhood.

Analysts say civilian members of the interim cabinet are trying to promote a political solution despite resistance from security services that want to crack down on the Brotherhood.

Mohamed ElBaradei, vice president in the new administration, said he was lobbying for talks with the Brotherhood, while others advocated crushing it.

"People are very angry with me because I am saying, 'Let's take time, let's talk to them'. The mood right now is, 'Let's crush them, let's not talk to them'," he said. "I hope the Brotherhood understands that time is not on their side.”

The Brotherhood, decrying the coup against the country's first freely-elected head of state, announced two new sit-ins and three marches to sensitive security facilities.

The Brotherhood said the security forces had fired tear gas on peaceful protesters. Seven Mursi supporters were also injured, security sources said.

Following the deaths of around 80 Mursi supporters on Saturday when security forces opened fire near one of the sit-ins, government pledges of action have raised concerns of more casualties. By pushing back any move to break up the sit-ins, the government has given the mediation effort a chance.

With the United States supplying Egypt with $1.3 billion in military aid each year and the United Arab Emirates having pledged $3 billion to the new administration, the countries may be able to help force a compromise with Qatar's help.

The biggest sit-in is in northeast Cairo, where several thousand Mursi supporters have been camped out for more than a month in a protest that at times swells to tens of thousands.

"We are here with our wives and children. We don't want violence," said Ali el-Shishtawi, a government employee at the sit-in. "We're not afraid. We're not terrorists like they say."

The new government gained a U.S. seal of approval late on Thursday when Kerry said the army had been "restoring democracy" when it toppled Mursi.

Washington's efforts to avoid calling Mursi's overthrow a "military coup" has left it open to charges of sending mixed messages about events in Egypt, long a bulwark of U.S. Middle East policy.

Mohamed Ali Bishr, a senior Brotherhood leader, said the movement was disappointed by Kerry's statement. "The United States is a country that speaks of democracy and human rights and they say something like that. I hope that they rethink their position and correct it," he told Reuters.

Last Mod: 03 Ağustos 2013, 11:01
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