Kosovo's adventure with secularism

Regardless of the opinion of the general public, in a country where those in the elite are all vying to catch the attention of their American supervisors, they are constantly pressing the people to distance themselves from religious values by holding on tight to secularism.

Kosovo's adventure with secularism

Sener Bilalli

Due to the location of the Balkans, the region has always been torn between the East and the West, not just geographically, but also ideologically.

Kosovo, which was once a province in the Ottoman Empire, was prevented from becoming an independent state after the empire's collapse as it was swallowed whole by the European-Slav alliance. This state, which is primarily comprised fo Muslim Albanians, was largely neglected during the Balkan wars and by policy makers after the war.

Kosovo was later incorporated into the state of Yugoslavia as an autonomous province, where it remained until it gained its independence. However, during this time, Kosovo gave rise to a highly influential sense of nationalism against Serb expansion.

Yugoslavian communists, who were seeking to prevent Kosovo from becoming a hub for Albania, sought to raise communist Albanians from Kosovo and thus turned it into a center for communist education. They established the first university in Pristine in 1960 for this purpose. Like this, they managed to curb Kosovo's nationalist tendencies and turn it into a center for raising communists for all Albanians.

After putting in such efforts, the region's Muslims were brought under their control. At the turn of the 1990s, however, when Yugoslavia was on the verge of breaking up, Kosovans who faced violence at the hands of the Serbs were left with no choice but to turn to the West for help. In doing so, Kosovo engaged in a silent yet swift transition process from a nationalist-communist state to a nationalist-democrat state aligned with the US.

With its independence guaranteed by the US, Kosovo began to make another transition away fron nationalism, changing their national symbols and anthems to match the new concept of a new state. This new concept is the foreign concept of secularism.

Regardless of the opinion of the general public, in a country where those in the elite are all vying to catch the attention of their American supervisors, they are constantly pressing the people to distance themselves from religious values by holding on tight to secularism.

Although this may sound very pessimistic, I am certain that this insistence on secularism will in the long-term disturb Kosovo's chemistry. The latest development in which the Kosovan parliament approved the silencing of the call to prayer from mosques in the capital Pristine is proof of this. This is the introduction of a new concept of secularism.

I say it is an introduction because after this I can only see things getting worse. The strange thing is, this type of secularism only applies for the Muslims of Kosovo. It is a secularism cooked up in the European kitchens. It is a secularism that many Europeans themselves can't even dream of, being dished out in front of the Muslims.

Could this possibly lead to the closing of madrasas, restrictions on the hajj pilgrimage and the banning of the headscarf?

The effects of this new Kosovan secularism can only be seen over time. I'm not saying that this will lead to catastrophe, but I am simply reflecting on the possible outcomes based on my experience with other countries that have tried and tested this type of secularism before.

Last Mod: 26 Mart 2014, 16:59
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Bianca
Bianca - 5 yıl Before

While raising one of the most perplexing issues of Kosovo today, the author unknowingly buys the Western narrative. Indeed, communism tried to lift Albanian identity at the expense of Serb minority disliked communists for religion. The secularism today is imposed in order to ban the ringing of church bells, not just call to prayer. The trouble is, Salafism is speading, while Sufism is almost gone today. Saudi Wahabi money has pushed out Turksihs influence in Kosovo and most of the Balkans.