Air Logistics Command corruption hides behind national security rules

Audit reports on the Air Logistics Command from the period of 1987-2012 reveal $5 billion unaccounted for.

Air Logistics Command corruption hides behind national security rules

World Bulletin/News Desk

An inspector from the Court of Accounts auditing the books of the Air Force Air Logistics Command found evidence of a major corruption incident, but no investigation could be launched as Air Force officers hid behind national security rules and refused to share documents.

Audit reports on the Air Logistics Command from the period of 1987-2012 reveal $5 billion unaccounted for. The Taraf daily shared some of the inspector's reports on Thursday.

According to the inspector's findings, equipment belonging to the command was given free of charge to various companies as “donations” or “loans.”

According to current rules, any donation or temporary loan of equipment should be approved by the Ministry of Defense. However, none of the donation or loan transactions that took place during the audited period had ministerial approval.

The auditor also found many items that were purchased but never went into the physical inventory of the command.

On Feb. 27, 2013, another newspaper, Hurriyet, covered the story. They focused, however, on the anger of the commanders, quoting one -- Mehmet Sanver, the general who heads the Air Logistics Command -- accusing the Court of Accounts auditor of overstepping his authority and demanding documents that are crucial to national security.

“Does he have the authority to do this?” Sanver asked in that news report.

The Court of Accounts detected seven instances of corrupt dealings at the Air Logistics Command and the auditor demanded defense statements and further documentation from the accounting personnel.

According to the auditor's findings, there was millions of dollars worth of equipment sitting in the warehouses of the Air Logistics Command that was new and not being used. In other words, the command purchased significant quantities of equipment to “help friends,” buying unnecessary materials at great expense to the state.

Another finding was that most of the equipment supposedly temporarily "loaned" to another company or institution -- 9,200 such items were discovered -- could never be recovered. An additional 16,000 or so items were given free of charge to various companies as unregistered donations.

Taraf also reported that Gen. Sanver recently established a special team to cover up the illegal purchases of equipment, donations and supposed loans. The team is tasked with finding the equipment unaccounted for in the report and registering it. However, an anonymous source told Taraf that much of the equipment could not be located.

Last Mod: 26 Nisan 2013, 09:23
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