Canakkale Battles is a mutual sorrow: Turkish FM

Davutoglu said the annual memorial was not a routine event but an effort to build a mutual memory to develop a future vision.

Canakkale Battles is a mutual sorrow: Turkish FM

World Bulletin / News Desk

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu attended on Monday, March 18th Canakkale Martyrs Memorial Services at Cebeci Asri Cemetery in Turkish capital Ankara.

Speaking at the memorial, Davutoglu said the annual memorial was not a routine event but an effort to build a mutual memory to develop a future vision.

"The Canakkale Battles is when the most concrete sign of a nation's will to survive appeared in history. It is a mutual woe as it is a sorrow for descendants of people both from Anatolia and other ancestry lands such as Skopje, Dagestan, Yemen and Syria to defend their lands. This will not only helped defend Canakkale and Istanbul but also showed that a nation's will could not be ignored," said Davutoglu.

Saying there was no other nation whose four percent of diplomats were killed, Davutoglu stated all terror attacks must be cursed. He also addressed martyrs' relatives. "Your sorrow is ours as well," he added.

Reminding 100th anniversary of Canakkale Victory will be held in 2015, Davutoglu noted that these lands would remain independent forever and this beloved nation would never surrender to any pressure and invasion.

Among the attendees were Turkish Deputy Foreign Minister Naci Koru, US Ambassador to Turkey Francis Ricciardone and several other ambassadors and diplomats.

From April 25, 1915 to January 9, 1916, a joint British and French assault was mounted to occupy the Ottoman capital of Istanbul and secure a sea route to Russia.

The attempt failed, leading to heavy casualties on both sides.

Battle of Gelibolu (Gallipoli) restored the Turkish Army's prestige in the world and constituted a milestone in Turkish nation's struggle for independence.

The events, considered the Ottoman Empire's biggest achievement during World War I, are known in the West as the "Gallipoli Campaign" or the "Battle of Gelibolu."

Last Mod: 18 Mart 2013, 16:59
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