Draft law seeks to ease criteria for Turkish private sector promotions

According to the bill, five years of private sector experience would be acceptable for appointment to general management positions at public institutions or government offices.

Draft law seeks to ease criteria for Turkish private sector promotions

An amendment to Civil Servants Law No. 657 that would reduce the requirement of individuals to have 12 years of civil servant experience to become a general manager in the public sector has been presented to Parliament, the Taraf daily reported on Friday.

According to the bill, five years of private sector experience would be acceptable for appointment to general management positions at public institutions or government offices.

In the current version of the law, it is necessary to work at least 12 years at a public institution before an individual can be appointed a general manager. Some public institutions will not appoint civil servants to higher positions if they do not have work experience at that particular institution.

The amendment would reduce the experience required for appointment to higher posts at a public institution from 12 to five years, and five years of work experience in the private sector would also be considered sufficient.

All potential managers are still required to be university graduates.

Around 3.5 million public servants are eagerly awaiting the amendment to the Civil Servants Law.

Contrary to expectations, no amendments were announced concerning the ability of civil servants to transfer to another city after having spent a period of time working in the office to which they were last appointed.

According to the bill, the length of experience required in a particular field to become an assistant inspector or assistant specialist in that field would be reduced from three years to two. Additionally, it would no longer be necessary for an individual to know a foreign language or to have written an academic paper in order to be classified as a specialist.

The bill would also make it possible for people whose public sector employment was terminated during the Feb. 28, 1997 coup period to return to their jobs. Thousands of people lost their jobs during the coup period on the grounds that they pray or wear headscarves. The Turkish military forced a coalition government led by a conservative party to resign on the grounds that it was increasing religious fundamentalism in the country.

Cihan

Last Mod: 18 Mayıs 2013, 10:20
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