Turkish public accepts solution process

Brussels-based think tank says although the government hesitates to press ahead with reform fearing of a national backlash, the solution process demonstrates how willing mainstream Turks would be to accept steps towards democratization.

Turkish public accepts solution process

Turkish public has accepted the solution process and accepted steps towards democratization, according to The International Crisis Group (ICG).

Brussels-based think tank has said in its report “Crying ‘Wolf’: Why Turkish Fears Need Not Block Kurdish Reform” that although the government in Ankara hesitated to press ahead with reform fearing of a national backlash, the solution process has demonstrated how willing mainstream Turks would be to accept steps towards democratization. “While the nationalist political opposition, including the Republican People’s Party (CHP) and Nationalist Action Party (MHP), has largely been against negotiations with the PKK and Kurdish reforms, the public has mostly accepted them.” The think tank noted the steps regarding to wide use of Kurdish in public has raised “little noticeable public anger.”

The think-tank also said there is a deep-rooted fear among some Turks that the negotiations have emboldened the PKK, it noted that most of the Kurdish community still wants a settlement within Turkey. It called PKK leaders and the Kurdish movement to stop issuing threats that fuel the Turkish public’s concerns about secession. “They should also denounce parallel state formations inside Turkey, including local militias, and signal the Kurds’ desire to live in Turkey alongside Turks, with whom they share a common history. Given the unique opportunities of the current process, the PKK should maintain its commitment to the ceasefire and restart withdrawals,” it said. The ICG stated the PKK should be doing more to persuade Ankara that it wants a compromise peace as well.

On the other hand, Brussels-based think tank also said that the government has “a critical responsibility” to fully address the longstanding democratic grievances of Turkey’s Kurds. “Turkish leaders, at the same time, must recommit to democratic reform, including a new constitution and laws that eliminate any ethnic bias. A new constitution could balance natural references to the Turkish nation with clear emphasis on equal citizenship for all in the Republic of Turkey and guarantee the full right to use mother languages in education and public life,” it stated.

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Last Mod: 08 Ekim 2013, 09:36
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